3 Process approach T 20

 

3.1 Process

Process types, management, realization and support processes

3.1 

If you cannot describe what you are doing as a process, you do not know what you're doing. Edwards Deming

The word processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) comes from the Latin root procedere = go, development, progress (Pro = forward, cedere = go). Each processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) transforms inputs into outputs, creating added value and potential nuisances. 

A processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) has three basic elements: inputs, activities and outputs. processus

A processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) can be very complex (launch a rocket) or relatively simple (audit a productany outcome of a process or activity (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.2)). A processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) is:

Process: activities that transform inputs into outputs

A processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) is, among other things, determined by its:

A processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) review is conducted periodically by the processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) owner (cf. annex 02).

The components of a processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) are shown in figure 3-1: processus

process components
Figure 3-1. Components of a process

Figure 3-2 shows an example that helps to answer some questions:

process
Figure 3-2. Some elements of a process

Often the output of a processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) is the input of the next processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1).

You can find some examples of processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) sheets in the document pack D 02 and a list of processes in annex 03.

Any organizationa structure that satisfies a need (see also ISO 9000, 3.3.1) (company) can be considered as a macro processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1), with its purpose, its inputs (customeranyone who receives a product (see also ISO 9000, 3.3.5) needs and expectations) and its outputs (products/services to meet customeranyone who receives a product (see also ISO 9000, 3.3.5) requirementsexplicit or implicit need or expectation (see also ISO 9000, 3.1.2)).

Our preference is to identify a processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) using a verb (buy, produce, sell) instead of a noun (purchases, production, sales) to differentiate the processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) from the company's department or documented information to maintain and recall the purpose of the processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1).

The processes are (as we shall see in the following paragraphs) of management, realization and support types. Do not attach too much importance to processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) categorizing (sometimes it's very relative) but ensure that all the company's activities fall into at least one processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1).

 

3.1.1 Management processes

Management processes are also known as piloting, decision, key or major processes. They are part in the overall organization and include elaboration of the policy, deployment of the objectives and all needed checks. They are the glue holding together all of the realization and support processes.

The following processes can be part of this family:

 

3.1.2 Realization processes

The realization (operational) processes are related to the productany outcome of a process or activity (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.2), increase the added value and contribute directly to customeranyone who receives a product (see also ISO 9000, 3.3.5) satisfaction. Two specific processes are shown in annex 04.

They are mainly:

 

3.1.3 Support processes

The support processes provide the resources necessary for the proper functioning of all other processes. They are not directly related to a contribution of the productany outcome of a process or activity (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.2)'s added value, but are still essential.

The support processes are often:

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3.2 Process mapping

Process mapping and house

 3.2

Par excellence processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) "mapping" is par excellence a multidisciplinary work. This is not a formal requirementexplicit or implicit need or expectation (see also ISO 9000, 3.1.2) of the ISO 22000 standard but it is always welcome. 

The three types of processes and some interactions are shown in figure 3-3:

process house
Figure 3-3. Process house

Interested party: person, group or company affected by the impacts of an organization

Examples of interested parties: investors, customers, distributors, consumers, employees, suppliers and society.

Mapping, among other things, allows you to:

To obtain a clearer picture, you can simplify by using a total of about 15 core processes. A core processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) can contain several sub-processes: for example, the processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) "develop the FSMS" can involve: processus

An example of the processactivities which transform inputs into outputs (see also ISO 9000, 3.4.1) "produce" is shown in figure 3-4: processus

produce
Figure 3-4. Produce process

Minute of relaxation. Game: Process

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3.3 Process approach

Process approach and continual improvement

3.3 

Simple solutions for now, perfection for later

The process approachmanagement by the processes to better satisfy customers, improve the effectiveness of all processes and increase global efficiency (see also ISO 9004, Annexe B.5) contributes enormously to the efficient management of the organizationa structure that satisfies a need (see also ISO 9000, 3.3.1).

Process approach: management by the processes to better satisfy customers, improve the effectiveness of all processes and increase global efficiency

When the process approachmanagement by the processes to better satisfy customers, improve the effectiveness of all processes and increase global efficiency (see also ISO 9004, Annexe B.5) is integrated during the development, implementation and continual improvementpermanent process allowing the improvement of the global performance of the organization (see also ISO 9000, 3.2.13 and ISO 14 001, 3.2) of an food safety management system, it allows one to achieve objectives that are related to interested parties' satisfaction, cf. annex 05.

The process approachmanagement by the processes to better satisfy customers, improve the effectiveness of all processes and increase global efficiency (see also ISO 9004, Annexe B.5) is based on the PDCA cycle, as shown in figure 3-5 (cf. ISO 22000, sub-clause 0.3.2).

fsms
Figure 3-5. Model of a FSMS

The process approachmanagement by the processes to better satisfy customers, improve the effectiveness of all processes and increase global efficiency (see also ISO 9004, Annexe B.5):

The process approachmanagement by the processes to better satisfy customers, improve the effectiveness of all processes and increase global efficiency (see also ISO 9004, Annexe B.5) is not:

smileyMinute of relaxation. Paganini's violin concert performed with facial expressions.

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